fishing-tools

Caring For Your Fishing Equipment

fishing-toolsThere will always be fishing situations that we have no control over which will result in losing a fish. It hurts, especially when it’s a big fish, but it happens it’s part of the sport. What we can have control over is making sure that we don’t lose fish because of faulty equipment. Spending some of your off water time taking care of your fishing tools will help you spend your on-water time being a more productive angler. Let’s take a look at some ways to care for fishing equipment.


Rods

Even though a fishing rod is nothing more than a lever it does have components that need to be checked. Start with your rod handles they should be glued down firmly and not be able to spin around the blank. Are the handles smooth enough to not cause blisters during a days fishing use? Make sure that the reel seat is glued in place and not cracked. Do all the screw down parts work smoothly and hold the reel tightly in place? Examine each guide and the tip making sure that none are cracked and that the thread wraps holding the guides in place are not torn or frayed. Check to see if the tip is loose and that all guides and tips are in line with the center of the reel seat.

snake-charmer

Snake Charmer

I guess it was back in the early eighties when Billy Palmer decided to drain his lake and dig out around the banks. It was a classic East Texas farm pond, with one exception, the cows didn’t have access to the whole lake.

It had all the classic features. Stumps, blow downs, mossy edge and an old dock. You could make it out about half way but the rest was rotted boards and a few poles. Great for dragging a big worm by or speeding a spinner bait through.

I had fished this lake for the last thirteen years. My big bass was an 8 something, we didn’t have scales back then, but we were usually pretty close. I had tangled with some bigger bass than that on this old pond.

I remember when Billy asked if I wanted to help him drain the lake, with his son Dirk and Kyle, I was all over it. I asked if I could bring a fishing buddy along that had been on the lake before, and he said sure. I knew Doug Flatley, one of my best friends, would kill to see what came out of this old pond.

sabine-lake-fishing

Sabine Lake

We had decided to meet around six by the Pleasure Island Restaurant on Sabine Lake. Today I was going to be filming a segment called KTBS Outdoors, in Shreveport Louisiana. I was fishing with some friends of mine for big specks and I could not have picked a better angling team.

sabine-lake-fishing
First, I had Brett Crawford, president of All Star Rods, a great guy and heck of an angler. Then there was Jim Franklin, he won the Troutmasters that year and was as fine an angler as I had ever met, and topping off my team for the day was Dickie Colburn, 30-year veteran Pro guide on Sabine.

I had waded the oyster reefs on Sabine in the past, I had waded the surf and on the jetties, but what was in store for me that day I will never forget.

Topwater-Fishing

Topwater Fishing

The topwater plug has got to rate right at the top when it comes to the different baits and the kind of reaction they draw when they are presented just right.

From the subtle” tap tap “on a Texas rig worm, to the solid “thump” we feel on a deep diving crank bait, each bait has own characteristics as far as how the bass “feels” on the strike.

Topwater-Fishing
But Topwaters, oh the mighty topwaters. I guess you could say I cut my teeth on a Tiny Torpedo, and yes, it was clear, on the stock ponds around East Texas and the big pond, Toledo Bend.

I want to share a few secrets with you about this kind of fishing and a bait that very few anglers use. Therefore, if your one of the inquisitive minds that search for new and useful information, then this is payday for you.

Let me cut right to the chase on this awesome, but rarely used topwater bait {Heddon doesn’t sponsor me so lets get that out of the way}

Denali-Highway-fishing

The Denali Highway Fishing

Denali-Highway-fishingThe lakes along the Denali Highway are Arctic Grayling territory. These cousins of the trout typically mature to 13 ounces, though the Alaska state record tips the scales at 4 pounds higher. They are easily fished from May to September and have a reputation for hitting just about anything, bait, lures or flies. The BLM recommends ten spots along the highway for grayling: Ten Mile Lake (mile 10), Tangle Lakes (mile 23), Landmark Gap Lake (mile 25), Rock Creek (mile 25), Fiftymile Lake (mile 50), Glacier Lake (mile 31), Sevenmile Lake (mile 40), Crooked Creek (mile 47), and Brushkana Creek ( mile 105).