forest

Do not smoke or light fires

forestSmoking is not only contradictory when trying to enjoy outdoor exercise and a natural environment, but may be the cause of a wildfire, and discomfort for the rest of non-smokers, smokers who do precisely the nature outings to forget the cigarette and the local fauna.

Either way, it is forbidden to light fires for any reason in many areas in all seasons, and particularly during the spring-summer, precisely to prevent fires.

fire-uses

Wildland Ethics – Use Fire Responsibly

fire-usesThe use of campfires in the backcountry was once a necessity and is now steeped in history and tradition. This tradition is so entrenched in our minds that for some the thought of going on a backcountry camping trip and not having a fire is almost unthinkable. Yet the natural appearance of many areas has been compromised by the overuse of fires and the ever-increasing demand for firewood. The development of versatile and efficient campstoves has facilitated a shift away from the traditional fire, making them essential equipment for minimum-impact camping. Stoves are fast and flexible, and they eliminate firewood availability as a concern in campsite selection. If you typically depend on fires as a light source, consider using a light-weight candle lantern as an alternative. The most important factors in determining whether or not to have a fire are:

use-of-fire

Minimize Use and Impact of Fires

use-of-fireCampfire impacts are among the most common and obvious recreational impacts in wildlands. In backcountry areas of the Northeast, campfires are generally discouraged, and in any of the region’s alpine zones, fires should never be built. Backcountry visitors should always carry the appropriate equipment for warmth, shelter and light, and a lightweight campstove for all cooking needs.

This recommendation against a once-traditional part of back country camping is due to ecological and aesthetic problems at recreation sites caused by overuse and abuse of fires and wood supplies. Because of these cumulative impacts, some land managers and owners have prohibited the use of campfires. Others allow their use in designated sites, or by permit only.