Denali-National-Park

Denali National Park

The rewards of hiking in Denali are many: spectacular vistas, encounters with wildlife, and the experience of being alone in wilderness. However, Denali has practically no trails. Most hiking is cross-country. Be prepared for uneven terrain, streams and brush. The different Denali terrains present distinct challenges, as well as distinct fascinations.

The taiga forest, found in the lower elevation areas, consists of primarily spruce trees, willow and other brush. This dense cover may impede hiking, but the struggle is often worth it for the vistas possible when you break through to the higher tundra areas.

The front country of Denali offers trails through the taiga forest making it easier to travel in this scenic area. The taiga forest is home to many different plants and animals including moose, bear, red squirrels, woodpeckers, and many varieties of berries.

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The Denali Highway – Mountains and Landscape

Denali-Highway-mountain-landscapeThe Alaska Range follows a broad arc for 650 miles, from Cook Inlet on Alaska’s west coast through the Denali massif and onward to the Canadian border. The Denali Highway passes through alpine tundra, paralleling this band of mountains to the south. Peaks like Mt. Hayes at 13,832′, Hess at 11,940′, and Mt. Deborah at 12,339′ dominate the skyline.

To the southeast, the Wrangell Mountains rise even higher. Although almost 80 miles away, Mt. Sanford at 16,237′ rises prominently, flanked by Mt Drum and Mt. Wrangell. As the northernmost active volcano on the Pacific Rim, Wrangell may at any time be venting steam into the Arctic air.

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The Denali Highway – Hiking

Denali-Highway-hikingThose wanting to take a break from the bike or car will find plenty of opportunities for strolling into the wilderness. Just beyond the Tangle Lakes, the Amphitheater Mountains jut out from the Alaska Range. A glacier carved a large hole through the mountains, Landmark Gap. A long finger of water has filled the bottom of the gap and the snowy caps of Mount Moffit and McGinnis Peak rise beyond it. Landmark Gap Lake is a great destination for an easy dayhike or overnighter. The route is a five-mile round trip along an old dirt track to the south shore. Trails extend along the lake and hikers can proceed through the gap to the north slope of the Amphitheaters.

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The Denali Highway Fishing

Denali-Highway-fishingThe lakes along the Denali Highway are Arctic Grayling territory. These cousins of the trout typically mature to 13 ounces, though the Alaska state record tips the scales at 4 pounds higher. They are easily fished from May to September and have a reputation for hitting just about anything, bait, lures or flies. The BLM recommends ten spots along the highway for grayling: Ten Mile Lake (mile 10), Tangle Lakes (mile 23), Landmark Gap Lake (mile 25), Rock Creek (mile 25), Fiftymile Lake (mile 50), Glacier Lake (mile 31), Sevenmile Lake (mile 40), Crooked Creek (mile 47), and Brushkana Creek ( mile 105).

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The Denali Highway

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Hike, Bike, Paddle and Explore along the Original Gateway to Denali National Park

Ten thousand years ago, hunters waited for the caribou around the Tangle Lakes, patiently chipping stones they would use as tools and weapons. A century ago, W. G. Jack struck gold near Valdez Creek, and within a few years, miners were pouring into the area. Mushers would soon run supplies to the gold camps along the dog-sled trail connecting Paxson and Cantwell. And when Denali National Park opened, the route became the gateway to the spectacular land surrounding North America’s highest peak.

Denali-Highway-history

The Denali Highway – History and Prehistory

Denali-Highway-historyThe Tangle Lakes area contains some of the earliest and most continuous evidence of human occupation in North America, extending back more than 10,000 years. At least four cultures occupied the area: the Denali Complex from 10,500 to 7,000 years ago; the Northern Archaic Tradition from 7,000 to 1,000 years ago; the Late Prehistoric Period from 1,000 years ago to 1770, and the current Athapaskan Tradition.

Over 400 archaeological sites dot the area. About 225,000 acres are officially designated as the BLM’s Tangle Lakes Archaeological District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The District is wide open to exploring and recreation. But remember the area is covered by the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, which prohibits collecting or damaging any artifacts or sites.

Denali high country fishing

Denali highlands adventures

Denali high country fishingWe are located at 18.5 mile on the Denali Highway in the heart of the Denali high country. We offer superb fishing for grayling, lake trout, rainbow trout, burbot, and salmon.

Transportation to and from the camp on the Denali will be provided from the Fairbanks Intn’l Airport. From camp to the fishing areas will be done by your own personal 4-wheeler (ATV) which we will provide. Instruction will be given to those who are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with the operation of these ATVs.

Our guide will escort you to spectacular fishing areas, while traveling through the pristine Denali highlands!

  • To photograph some of the most majestic country and scenery that Alaska has to over!
  • To capture on film the rich and varied wildlife that you will encounter during your trip!
  • To record the highlights of this most unforgettable experience!
  • To help recall to memory in years to come the pleasure, excitement, and emotion of this adventure into the Alaskan wilderness!